Cenke Xu, University of California, Santa Barbar

self-dual quantum critical points in 2+1 dimensions

Kadanoff Seminar

April 24, 2017
ACC 211 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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JFI Seminar - Prof. David Cobden, Department of Physics, Washington University

"Electronic Phases and Phase Transitions in Van der Waals Monolayers"

ABSTRACT: Atomically thin materials can host many kinds of electronic phases, some unique to the 2D limit. Our observations indicate the realization of a quantum spin Hall state, an excitonic insulator, superconductivity, and ferro- and antiferromagnetism in van der Waals monolayers. Unlike 3D solids, monolayers are amenable to surface probes and can be doped by electrostatic gating. We are thus investigating ways to induce transitions between these phases electrostatically. In WTe2 monolayers at low temperatures we observe a transition between a two-dimensional topological insulator and a bulk conducting phase as a function of gate voltage, representing a gate-controlled quantum phase transition.Host: Jiwoong Park, 4-3179 or via email to jwpark@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.

Special JFI Seminar

April 24, 2017
ERC 161 | Monday, 2:00 pm

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Andy Borovik:University of California, Irvine

Synthetic Chemistry as a Window into Biology

Chemistry

April 24, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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Lenka Zdeborova, CNRS & CEA, Saclay, France

Computations in Science

April 26, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Andrew Kruse, PhD, Harvard Medical School

New approaches to investigate G protein-coupled receptor function

Biophysical Dynamics

April 27, 2017
GCIS W301 | Thursday, 12:00 pm

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Cameron Reed, Alma College

Host: Henry Frisch

Physics Colloquium

April 27, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Qiu Wang, Duke University

Leveraging Chemistry for Biology and Therapy: – New amination strategies to access biologically important molecules

Chemistry

April 28, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Dominic Else, University of California, Santa Barbara

Floquet Time Crystals: How time-translation symmetry protects phases of matter

A "Floquet time crystal" is a phase of matter in a periodically driven (Floquet) system which spontaneously breaks discrete time-translation symmetry. They are an entirely new "non-thermal" phase of matter which cannot exist in undriven systems. In this talk, I will discuss the recent theoretical prediction and experimental observation of Floquet time crystals. Time-translation symmetry occupies a special role in physics, since its generator is the Hamiltonian itself. Nevertheless, the theoretical formulation of time crystals turns out to be *almost* the same as for other symmetry-breaking phases of matter. I will also consider phases of matter in which the discrete time-translation symmetry is not spontaneously broken but nevertheless protects non-trivial phases, which are the analogs of "symmetry-protected topological" and "symmetry-enriched topological" phases for other symmetries.

Kadanoff Seminar

May 1, 2017
ACC 211 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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Kharasch Memorial Lecture - Sir Shankar Balasubramanian, University of Cambridge

Decoding human genomes on a population scale

Chemistry

May 1, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium - Benjamin Lev, Department of Physics and Applied Physics - Stanford University

New Tools for Exploring Nonequilibrium Quantum Many-Body Physics

ABSTRACT: The simulation of quantum systems using ultracold atomic gases—quantum simulation—may be viewed as the creation of novel quantum systems in their own right rather than the simulation of well-known models. Often these systems possess collective properties impossible to observe in the solid state. In particular, these gaseous systems provide unique testbeds for emergent physics, especially that out of equilibrium. We present two novel avenues of inquiry into quantum nonequilibrium physics: the creation of dissipative quantum spin glasses and quantum neural networks using atoms coupled to the photonic modes of a confocal optical resonator and the study of nonequilibrium quench dynamics in highly magnetic and strongly interacting gases. Besides investigating long-unresolved issues in statistical mechanics (i.e., the order of spin glasses and thermalization in closed quantum systems), the experimental directions discussed point to novel neuromorphic computational architectures relying on driven-dissipative quantum dynamics.Host: Jonathan Simon, 2-9661 or via email at simonjon@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.

The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

May 2, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Peter Littlewood, University of Chicago

Host: Mel Shochet

Physics Colloquium

May 4, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Kharasch Memorial Lecture - Sir Shankar Balasubramanian, University of Cambridge

How large is the natural DNA alphabet?

Chemistry

May 5, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Snir Gazit, University of California at Berkeley

Charged fermions coupled to Ising gauge fields: Symmetry breaking, confinement, and emergent Dirac fermions.

Lattice gauge theories are ubiquitous in physics, describing a wide range of phenomena from quark confinement to quantum materials. At finite fermion density, gauge theories are notoriously hard to analyze due to the fermion sign problem. Here, we investigate the Ising gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, a problem of great interest in condensed matter, and show that it is free of the sign problem at arbitrary fermion density. At generic filling, we find that gauge fluctuations mediate pairing leading to a transition between a deconfined BCS state to a confined BEC. At half-filling, a $\pi$-flux phase is generated spontaneously with emergent Dirac fermions. The deconfined Dirac phase, with a vanishing Fermi surface volume, is a non-trivial example of violation of Luttinger's theorem due to fractionalization. At strong coupling, we find a single continuous transition between the deconfined Dirac phase and the confined BEC, in contrast to the expected split transition.

Kadanoff Seminar

May 8, 2017
ACC 211 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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The 2nd Tuesday JFI Colloquium - Eric Borguet - Department of Chemistry, Temple University

Philippe Guyot-Sionnest, 2-7461 or via email at pgs@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.

The 2nd Tuesday JFI Colloquium

May 9, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Philip Nelson, University of Pennsylvania

Old and new news about single-photon sensitivity in human vision

One often hears that human vision is “sensitive to single photons,” when in fact the faintest flash of light that can reliably be reported by human subjects is closer to 100 photons. Nevertheless, there is a sense in which the familiar claim is true. Experiments conducted long after the seminal work of Hecht, Shlaer, and Pirenne now allow a more precise, and in some ways even more remarkable, conclusion to be drawn about our visual apparatus. A simple model that incorporates both old news (response of single rod cells) and newer news (loss at the first synapse) can account in detail for both old and new psychophysical data.

Computations in Science

May 10, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Lisa Manning, Syracuse University

Host: Sid Nagel

Physics Colloquium

May 11, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Alex Miller: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Cation-Responsive Pincer-Crown Ether Complexes for Tunable Catalysis

Chemistry

May 12, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 4:00 pm

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Lukasz Fidkowski, Stony Brook University

Chiral phases in Floquet quantum systems

Kadanoff Seminar

May 15, 2017
ACC 211 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Alan Aspuru-Guzik, Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Host: Polina Navotnaya,2-6066 or via email at pnavotnaya@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.

The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 16, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Jeremy England, MIT

Computations in Science

May 17, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Joe Incandela

Physics Colloquium

May 18, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Danna Freedman:Northwestern University

Applying Inorganic Chemistry to Challenges in Physics

Chemistry

May 19, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Dmitri Feldman, Brown University

Kadanoff Seminar

May 22, 2017
ACC 211 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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Stephen J. Lippard: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Chemistry

May 22, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Mohammad Hafezi, Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland

Host: Jonathan Simon, 2-9661 or via email at simonjon@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.

The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 23, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Stuart Rowan, The University of Chicago

Computations in Science

May 24, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Sophie Martin, PhD, University of Lausanne

How to mate once and only once: Yeast gamete fusion rapidly reconstitutes a bi-partite transcription factor to block re-fertilization

Biophysical Dynamics

May 25, 2017
GCIS W301 | Thursday, 12:00 pm

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Erez Berg, University of Chicago

Host: Philippe Guyot-Sionnest

Physics Colloquium

May 25, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Closs Lecture-Martyn Poliakoff, University of Nottingham

Chemistry

May 26, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Matteo Cardnello, Chemical Engineering Department, Stanford University

Tackling Big Challenges Using Tiny Crystals

ABSTRACT: The understanding that fossil fuels are not endless and that their extensive use is causing irreversible climate changes prompted us to realize that we are in urgent need of sustainable energy generation processes, energy vectors, and solutions to reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Despite replacing fossil fuels while maintaining or improving the current standards of living with a growing population is one of the biggest challenges that we have to face, the solution might lie in tiny pieces of matter: nanocrystals. Nanocrystals have been known for a long time but it is only recently that we have been able to better study and control their properties. The advent of nanotechnology and its associated tools allowed indeed to manipulate the composition, size, shape, functionalization and assembly of nanocrystals and to create nanoarchitectures and macroscopic devices with novel properties and unrivaled performance. In this talk, the use of uniform and tailored nanocrystals for energy and environmental applications will be presented, with emphasis on how to precisely control the nanostructures to understand and exploit interactions between well defined building blocks. Applications include hydrogen generation through photocatalysis, reduction of methane emissions, pollution control, and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms. It is expected that advancements in the preparation and use of these tiny crystals can bring immense benefit for making big challenges more approachable. Host: Dmitri Talapin, 4-2607 or via email at dvtalapin@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.

The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 30, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Jacob Bean, University of Chicago

Host: Mel Shochet

Physics Colloquium

June 1, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Siria Serrano, Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Host: Polina Navotnaya,2-6066 or via email at pnavotnaya@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.

The Tuesday JFI Seminar

June 6, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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