Professor Preston Snee, University of Illinois at Chicago

Transient X-Ray Absorption of Semiconductor Quantum Dots Reveals New Charge Transport Phenomenon


Chemistry

November 17, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Yuval Elhanati, Princeton University

Probabilistic Inference of the Adaptive Immune System

The adaptive immune system can recognize many different threats by maintaining a large diversity of cells with different membrane receptors. We study the complex stochastic processes that generate and shape this ensemble of immune receptors using probabilistic models. These models can be inferred from high throughput sequence data using statistical algorithms. Specifically, we can use a technique based on transfer matrices formulation to learn the probabilistic properties of the generation process. We can then model also selection effects on the generated cells using maximum likelihood methods. Our methods allow us to characterize and study the diversity of the distribution beyond the sample data itself, disentangling and uncovering the details of the biological processes shaping it. We find universality - different individuals, humans and mice separately, have very similar underlying processes shaping the repertoire. This universality in turn acts as a baseline for further study of the system under perturbations such as infections or vaccination. Eventually we plan to harvest the statistical power of the models to diagnose and help plan treatments to clinical conditions from infections to cancer.
JFI Theory Seminar

November 20, 2017
KPTC 206 | Monday, 1:00 pm

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Professor Jay Groves, University of California, Berkeley

Signal Transduction on Membrane Surfaces


Chemistry

November 20, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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Abigail Knight, PhD, Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow, UCSB

Bioinspired Metal-Coordinating Materials

Coordination of metal ions is critical to the structure and function of a variety of natural materials and allows a diverse array of capabilities currently unavailable to synthetic structures. This talk will highlight efforts towards mimicking two capabilities of natural materials: (1) the selective coordination of metal ions and (2) implementing metal ions to induce a morphological shift in self-assembled materials. Selective coordination is critical to the function of a variety of natural proteins, yet synthetic ligands with this capability are rare despite applications in heavy metal remediation, therapeutics, and recycling. A combinatorial platform implementing N-substituted glycine oligomers, or peptoids, was designed to identify motifs capable of chelating low concentrations of various metal ions in complex sample media. Amphiphilic marine siderophores have a more unique capability to undergo a morphological shift upon metal coordination. Inspired by these structures, coordinating peptide polymer amphiphiles were designed that undergo self-assembly directed by coordination geometry, adding to the toolbox of stimuli responsive materials.
Molecular Engineering

November 21, 2017
ERC 201B | Tuesday, 11:00 am

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Sang Ouk Kim KAIST Chair Professor, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, KAIST

Liquid Crystalline Graphene Oxide Nanoscale Assembly for Functional Structures

Graphene Oxide Liquid Crystal (GOLC) is a newly emerging graphene based material, which exhibits nematic type colloidal liquid crystallinity with orientational ordering of graphene oxide flakes in good solvents, including water. Since our first discovery of GOLC in aqueous dispersion, this interesting mesophase has been utilized for many different application fields, such as liquid crystalline graphene fiber spinning, graphene membrane/film production, prototype liquid crystal display and so on. Interestingly, GOLC also allow us a valuable opportunity for the highly ordered molecular scale assembly of functional nanoscale structures. This presentation will introduce our current status of GOLC research particularly focusing on the nanoscale assembly of functional nanostructures. Besides, relevant research works associated to the nanoscale assembly and chemical modification of various nanoscale materials will be presented.
Molecular Engineering

November 27, 2017
ERC 301B | Monday, 11:00 am

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AJ Boydston Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry University of Washington

Integrated Synthesis, Design, Additive Manufacturing, and Mechanoresponsive Materials

For this seminar, I hope to discuss two research thrusts from my program: Additive Manufacturing with Mechanoresponsive Materials, and Metal-Free Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization. Our research team focuses on the chemistry of additive manufacturing with emphasis on: 1) incorporation of functional materials, particularly those that respond via conversion of mechanical force into chemical reactivity; 2) expansion of the materials space available for AM; and 3) selective multi-material printing from “all-in-one” mixed-resin vats. As representative examples, we will discuss melt-material extrusion of custom mechanochromic filaments, novel formulations that enable inexpensive and efficient access to elastomeric components via vat photopolymerization, and progress toward parallel photo-radical/photo-cationic printing mechanisms for production of graded materials. Our longer-term research objectives center on the ability to integrate mechanoresponsive materials (molecular- to nanoscale), property gradation or heterogeneity (nano- to microscale), and object geometry (micro- to mesoscale) to answer key scientific questions about the interplay between mechanics (and dynamics) of lattice structures and chemo-mechanical coupling. A major synthetic effort of my program centers on the development of photoredox-mediated, metal-free methods for polymer synthesis. Recently, we discovered that visible light photoredox catalysis is a viable approach for conducting ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of strained cycloalkenes. This divergence from metal-mediated polymerizations introduces a new mechanistic theme for ROMP with unique synthetic outcomes. We will present our fundamental studies on the mechanism of this polymerization and updates on our applications-oriented research toward commercialization.
Molecular Engineering

November 28, 2017
ERC 161 | Tuesday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. John Parkhill, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Notre Dame

Quantum dynamics with Statistical Effects and Statistical Models of Quantum Effects

The capability of electronic structure to calculate the wavefunctions, and even dynamics of large systems has improved dramatically. This has put electronic structure into an uncomfortable regime where statistical effects become as important as the correlation problem. I will discuss our efforts to describe mixed-state electronic dynamics with density matrix equations of motion, and the applications of those theories to ultrafast experiments. Realtime mean field theories such as RT-TDDFT and RT-TDHF dominate applications because of the speed required to access picosecond timescales. Yet TDHF and TDDFT are not accurate enough to properly model resonant driving, which is only one ingredient in ultrafast spectroscopy. In this talk I discuss a simple density-matrix equation of motion implemented as an approximation to RT-TDDFT, which excites properly on resonance. Based on this foundation I compare the non-equilibrium steady states of the correct DFT and a Markovian bath model, with essentially exact results coming from HEOM showing that TDDFT can be used to study driven ultrafast dynamics. I then discuss self-consistency in correlated corrections to TDDFT which have low cost and can be applied to large systems. Statistical sampling of molecular geometries has become an equally important issue, although empirical density functionals, which are the most practical tools for exploring geometries, make an ambiguous mixture of quantum physics and statistical modeling. I will demonstrate purely statistical models of molecular structure, and show that in the near future it is likely that purely empirical models of the PES will have several appealing advantages over empirical hybrids. of quantum mechanical models with statistics.For further information please contact Brenda Thomas at 773-702-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu. You may also contact the Host, David Mazziotti at 773-834-1762 or via email at damazz@uchicago.edu.
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

November 28, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Emanuela Del Gado, Georgetown University


Computations in Science

November 29, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Lydia Kisley, University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign

Proteins in Nanoporous Hydrogels: Adsorption, Diffusion, and Folding


Chemistry

November 30, 2017
Kent 120 | Thursday, 1:15 pm

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Bettina Hoerlin and Gino Segrè

Enrico Fermi: The Pope of Physics

Enrico Fermi has been called the last scientist who knew all of physics, having attained the heights of the profession as a theorist and experimentalist. Unique in numerous ways, this 20th century physicist was entirely self-taught; the breadth and depth of his research remain unparalleled. Fermi’s 1938 Nobel Prize was picked up en route in his flight from fascist Italy with his Jewish wife and children to a new life in America. In 1942 he became the lead scientist in the University of Chicago experiment that produced the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction, a key precursor to building the atomic bomb. His role in the success of the Manhattan Project was critical.

This lecture combines Fermi’s personal life with his scientific contributions and illustrates how he was shaped by history and how he, in turn, shaped history. Legendarily apolitical, Fermi was reluctantly involved in American political decision making during the war and afterwards. The many challenges he faced, including the tensions between politics and science, are still relevant today.
Physics Colloquium

November 30, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Scott J. Miller, Yale University

Searching for Selective Catalytic Reactions in Complex Molecular Environments


Chemistry

December 1, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Ilya Nemenman, Emory University


Computations in Science

December 6, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Jay Gambetta, IBM


Molecular Engineering

December 7, 2017
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Julia Widom, University of Michigan

Structure and Dynamics of Nucleic Acids by Nonlinear Spectroscopy and Single-Molecule Microscopy


Chemistry

December 7, 2017
GCIS W301 | Thursday, 1:15 pm

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Professor Lutz H. Gade, Universität Heidelberg

Enantioselective Catalysis with 3D Transition Metal Complexes: Chiral Pincers as Stereodirecting Ligands


Chemistry

December 8, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Physics with A Bang! Holiday Lecture and JFI Open House

Students, families, teachers and especially the curious are invited to attend our annual Holiday Lecture and Open House. See fast, loud, surprising and beautiful physics demos performed by Profs. Heinrich Jaeger and Sidney Nagel. Talk to scientists about their latest discoveries. Participate in hands-on activities related to their research.

Saturday, December 9th, 2017
Kersten Physics Teaching Center
5720 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL

Lecture repeated at 11am and 2pm
Open House and Demo Alley from 12pm-4pm
Lab Tours in the afternoon

View the Live Stream of the 11am Show
View the Live Stream of the 2pm Show
See archived shows on our YouTube Channel

Doors for the Lectures open 30 minutes before each show. Admission to this event is free. Please note: there will be no online registrations, and will be a first to arrive, first ticketed event. We do not guarantee availibility of seating, but shows will also be streamed live to alternate venues.

This event is sponsored by the James Franck Institute, the Department of Physics, the Office of the Executive Vice President for Research, Innovation and National Laboratories, and the Materials Research Science & Engineering Center. The organizer of the Open House is Cheng Chin.
Special JFI Seminar

December 9, 2017
KPTC 106 | Saturday, 11:00 am

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Lea Nienhaus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

From Imaging Excitons at the Nanoscale to Emerging Device Applications


Chemistry

December 12, 2017
Kent 101 | Tuesday, 1:15 pm

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Professor Tohru Fukuyama, Nagoya University

Synthetic Studies on Tetrodotoxin

Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is one of the most famous marine natural products, which is found most notably in the liver and ovary of puffer fish. It is the toxin responsible for the fatal food poisoning caused by improperly cooked puffer fish in Japan. This compound also serves as an important biochemical tool in neurophysiology since it exhibits neurotoxicity by selectively blocking sodium channels of excitable cell membranes. Despite its relatively small molecular size, TTX possesses eight contiguous stereogenic centers in its polyfunctionalized dioxaadamantane skeleton including an orthoester and a guanidine moieties. This fascinating molecule has been a popular target for many synthetic chemists although only a few successful total syntheses have been reported to date. We initiated our synthetic studies on TTX in the hope of identifying the exact location of sodium channels where TTX blocks. Recent progress of our approach will be discussed in the lecture.
Chemistry

December 18, 2017
Kent 101 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Rachel Segalman, UC Santa Barbara


Molecular Engineering

January 4, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Heinrich Jaeger, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

January 10, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Andrei Tokmakoff, University of Chicago


Molecular Engineering

January 18, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, Georgia Tech


Computations in Science

January 24, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Michael Hagan, Department of Physics and Quantative Biology, Brandeis University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

January 30, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Jens Eggers , University of Bristol


Computations in Science

January 31, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Naomi Halas, Rice University


Molecular Engineering

February 1, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Jonathan A. Rogers, Department of Chemistry, Simpson/Querrey Institute - Northwestern University


The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

February 6, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Haim Diamant, Tel Aviv University


Computations in Science

February 7, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Joaquin Rodriguez-Lopez, University of Illinois


Molecular Engineering

February 15, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Ivan I Smalyukh, University of Colorado Boulder


Computations in Science

February 21, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Jeff Snyder, Northwestern University


Molecular Engineering

March 1, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Joi Ito, MIT Media Lab Director


Molecular Engineering

March 14, 2018
ERC 161 | Wednesday, 11:00 am

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Aleksandra Vojvodic, University of Pennsylvania


Molecular Engineering

March 15, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium - Prof. Ignacio Franco, Department of Chemistry, Rochester University


The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

April 3, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Demetri Psaltis, EPFL


Molecular Engineering

April 5, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Dr. Atac Imamoglu, Department of Physics , ETH Zurich


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

April 17, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Alfred Crosby, University of Massachusetts Amherst


Computations in Science

April 18, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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William Dichtel, Northwestern University


Molecular Engineering

April 19, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Garnet Chan, Department of Chemistry, Princeton University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

April 24, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Martin van Hecke, Leiden Institute of Physics


Computations in Science

April 25, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Ned Wingreen


Computations in Science

May 2, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Ronald Germain


Molecular Engineering

May 3, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Lauren Webb, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas-Austin


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 15, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Douglas Tobias, University of California - Irvine


Molecular Engineering

May 17, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Jin-Quan Yu, Scripps Research Institute


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 22, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Ariel Amir, Harvard


Computations in Science

May 23, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Valeria Molinero


Molecular Engineering

June 7, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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