Frederick A. Heberle, PhD, Biology & Soft Matter Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Lipid organization in complex biomimetic membranes: Insight from Scattering & Simulation

The 3-dimensional architecture of biological membranes has functional consequences for living cells. In the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, lipids are thought to organize into ordered yet fluid domains, with diverse evidence supporting participation of these “rafts” in membrane processes including protein sorting and signaling. Cells also actively maintain an asymmetric distribution of different lipid types between the plasma membrane’s inner and outer leaflets, resulting in transmembrane differences in fluidity and charge density. Despite intense interest, the fundamental mechanisms controlling raft size and morphology, as well as coupling between leaflets of different composition, remain elusive. The precise determination of phase-separated and asymmetric bilayer structure is a crucial step toward a deeper understanding of these mechanisms. To this end, small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering are powerful biophysical tools for interrogating both lateral and transverse bilayer structure with sub-nanometer resolution. Molecular dynamics simulations probe further still, providing a glimpse of membrane organization with atomic detail. In this talk, I will describe new approaches for combining experimental and computational data to obtain a detailed structural picture of complex biomimetic membranes.
Biophysical Dynamics

September 19, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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Professor Yossi Weizmann, University of Chicago

Synthetic Nucleic Acid Topology and Colloidal LEGO-Like Nanoparticles for Biological and Plasmonic Applications


Chemistry

September 25, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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Polina Anikeeva, PhD, MatSci and Eng, MIT

Probing Neural Function with Electronic, Optical & Magnetic Materials

Mammalian nervous system contains billions of neurons that exchange electrical, chemical and mechanical signals. Our ability to study this complexity is limited by the lack of technologies available for interrogating neural circuits across their diverse signaling modalities without inducing a foreign-body reaction. My talk will describe neural interface strategies pursued in my group aimed at mimicking the materials properties and transduction mechanisms of the nervous system. Specifically, I will discuss (1) Fiber-based probes for multifunctional interfaces with the brain and spinal cord circuits; (2) Magnetic nanotransducers for minimally invasive neural stimulation; and (3) Active scaffolds for neural tissue engineering and interrogation.
Fiber-drawing methods can be applied to create multifunctional polymer-based probes capable of simultaneous electrical, optical, and chemical probing of neural tissues in freely moving subjects. Similar engineering principles enable ultra-flexible miniature fiber-probes with geometries inspired by nerves, which permit simultaneous optical excitation and recording of neural activity in the spinal cord allowing for optical control of lower limb movement. Furthermore, fiber-based fabrication can be extended to design of scaffolds that direct neural growth and activity facilitating repair of damaged nerves.
Molecular mechanisms of action potential firing inspire the development of materials-based strategies for direct manipulation of ion transport across neuronal membranes. For example, hysteretic heat dissipation by magnetic nanomaterials can be used to remotely trigger activity of neurons expressing heat-sensitive ion channels. Since the alternating magnetic fields in the low radiofrequency range interact minimally with the biological tissues, the magnetic nanoparticles injected into the brain can act as transducers of wireless magnetothermal deep brain stimulation. Similarly, local hysteretic heating allows magnetic nanoparticles to disrupt protein aggregates associated with neurodegenerative disorders.
Biophysical Dynamics

September 26, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Suri Vaikuntanathan, Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago

Non-equilibrium Pathways for Self Assembly and Organization

Nonequilibrium forces can drive specific and novel pathways to modulate self-assembly and organization. The close connection between energy dissipation and organization is particularly apparent in biology. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that nonequilibrium forces are crucial for the functioning of biochemical processes responsible for error correction, adaptation and timing of events in the cell cycle. However, unlike the behavior and characteristics of equilibrium systems, where no energy is dissipated, general principles governing fluctuations about a steady state or the steady state itself in far-from-equilibrium conditions are just being discovered. In my talk, I describe how tools from non-equilibrium statistical mechanics can be used to direct self assembly far-from-equilibrium, engineer novel spatiotemporal correlations in active liquids, and finally support properties such as ultra sensitivity in non-equilibrium biochemical networks. These results provide a framework for uncovering fundamental design principles of organization in non-equilibrium chemical and biological processes.
For further information please contact Brenda Thomas at 773-702-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu. You may contact the Host, Aaron Dinner at 773-702-2330 or via email to dinner@uchicago.edu.
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

September 26, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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IME Special Seminar: Antoine Georges

Quantum Materials: Bridging Physical Mechanisms, Simple Models and Realistic Computations

Quantum Materials display competing phases with fascinating physical properties, which result from the multiple degrees of freedom in presence (charge, spin, orbital, lattice) and from strong electronic correlations. In this talk, I will show how computational methods aimed at the quantum many-body problem can be combined with realistic electronic structure methods in order to shed light on these physical properties, help identify relevant mechanisms and formulate simple effective models. This will be mostly illustrated by rare-earth nickelates, a family of materials displaying a metal-insulator transition which can be controlled by strain, gating or light, pulses.
Molecular Engineering

September 28, 2017
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Professor Bryan Dickinson, University of Chicago

Molecular Imaging and Evolutionary Approaches to Probe and Control Biology


Chemistry

October 2, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Dr. Sho Yaida, Department of Chemistry, Duke University

Novel Phase Transition within Amorphous Solids

"Glassy materials are omnipresent in everyday life from windows to plastics to piles of sand. Yet our understanding of both their (equilibrium) liquid and (out-of-equilibrium) solid phases lags far behind that of crystalline counterparts. Recent advances are rapidly changing the ways in which we understand these common-yet-physically-enigmatic materials. This talk overviews one such advance -- the discovery of the Gardner phase transition from normal to marginally-stable glasses. Our work in particular indicates that such a transition, first found in abstract infinite-dimensional models, can survive down to the three-dimensional world. This transition reinforces the overriding role of rugged free-energy landscapes that dictate physics of glassy systems, with tangible consequences on jamming, yielding, and beyond.



For further information please contact Brenda Thomas at 773-702-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu. You may also contact the Host, Arvind Murugan at 773-834-3146 or via email at amurugan@uchicago.edu."
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

October 3, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Manu Prakash , Stanford University


Computations in Science

October 4, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Professor Dale L. Boger, Stiegliitz Lecture

Redesign of Vancomycin for Resistant Bacteria


Chemistry

October 9, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Philip Kim, Department of Chemistry, Harvard University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

October 10, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Nigel Goldenfeld, University of Illinois


Computations in Science

October 11, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Professor Christophe Coperet, ETH Zurich, Wheland Lecture

Molecular Understanding and Controlled Functionalization of Surfaces Towards Single-Site Catalysts and Beyond


Chemistry

October 16, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Wassem Bakr, Department of Physics, Princeton University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

October 17, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Professor Christophe Coperet, ETH Zurich, Wheland Lecture

NMR Chemical Shifts: Beyond Numbers and How to Use them to Decode the Reactivity of Organometallic Compounds


Chemistry

October 17, 2017
Kent 120 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Professor Christophe Coperet, ETH Zurich, Wheland Lecture

Surface Coordination Chemistry


Chemistry

October 18, 2017
GCIS W301 | Wednesday, 12:00 pm

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Juan De Pablo, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

October 18, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Professor Xavier Roy, Columbia University

Molecular Clusters: Building Blocks for Nanoelectronics and Material Design


Chemistry

October 20, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Professor Sukbok Chang, KAIST

Development of Direct C-H Amination Reactions


Chemistry

October 23, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Sabre Kais, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

October 24, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Professor Noah Burns, Stanford University

Synthesis and Study of Unusual Lipids


Chemistry

October 27, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Jiwoong Park, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

November 8, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Erez Berg, Department of Physics, University of Chicago


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

November 14, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Hod Lipson, Columbia University


Computations in Science

November 15, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. John Parkhill, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Notre Dame


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

November 28, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Emanuela Del Gado, Georgetown University


Computations in Science

November 29, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Ilya Nemenman, Emory University


Computations in Science

December 6, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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JFI Open House / Physics With a Bang!


Special JFI Seminar

December 9, 2017
KPTC 106 | Saturday, 11:00 am

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Heinrich Jaeger, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

January 10, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Michael Hagan, Department of Physics and Quantative Biology, Brandeis University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

January 30, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Jonathan A. Rogers, Department of Chemistry, Simpson/Querrey Institute - Northwestern University


The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

February 6, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Haim Diamant, Tel Aviv University


Computations in Science

February 7, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar -Prof. Mikael Rechtsman, Department of Physics, Penn State University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

March 13, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Alfred Crosby, University of Massachusetts Amherst


Computations in Science

April 18, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Ned Wingreen


Computations in Science

May 2, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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