Shubhayu Chatterjee, Harvard University

Intertwining topological order and discrete broken symmetries in the hole-doped cuprates via quantum fluctuating antiferromagnetism

The enigmatic pseudogap metal phase of the hole-doped cuprate superconductors has two seemingly unrelated characteristics: (i) a gap in the electronic spectrum along the axes of the square lattice Brillouin zone, and (ii) the presence of discrete broken symmetries (like rotation, inversion or time-reversal). In a normal metal with full translational symmetry, a gap in the electron spectrum in the anti-nodal region cannot be explained by such broken symmetries. We propose a resolution to this puzzle by intertwining topological order with broken symmetries in the pseudogap metal. We show that the required flavors of topological order, corresponding to precisely the broken symmetries observed in the cuprates, arise naturally in a SU(2) gauge theory of quantum fluctuations of magnetically ordered phases that lie proximate to the Néel phase. We explore how alternative descriptions of fluctuating Néel antiferromagnets, in terms of the semiclassical O(3) non-linear σ model, and the CP1 model, also naturally lead to the same phases. If time permits, we will also discuss comparisons between the gauge theory and recent numerical (DMFT and QMC) results on the two-dimensional Hubbard model.
Kadanoff Seminar

October 23, 2017
PRC 201 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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Professor Sukbok Chang, KAIST

Development of Direct C-H Amination Reactions


Chemistry

October 23, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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IME Distinguished Speakers in Technology & Industry: Darlene Solomon, Agilent Technologies

A View into the "Century of Biology" and Agilent

Technology leadership based on a culture of innovation, contribution and sustained R&D investment has been at the core of Agilent's success through decades of market and technology waves. Today, biology is the field where science and understanding are most rapidly changing. This talk will highlight key megatrends in this 'century of biology', Agilent's transition from being a predominantly electronics and semiconductor company into one fully-focused on the life science and diagnostics industries, and some of the technology contributions underway at Agilent that will underlie tomorrow's breakthroughs.
Molecular Engineering

October 24, 2017
ERC 161 | Tuesday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Sabre Kais, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University

Near Term Applications of Quantum Simulation and Quantum Computing Devices

The exact solution of the Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules and extended systems continues to be a “Holy Grail” problem for the field of atomic and molecular physics since inception. Recently, breakthroughs have been made in the development of hardware-efficient quantum optimizers and coherent Ising machines capable of simulating hundreds of interacting spins through an Ising-type Hamiltonian. One of the most vital questions associated with these new devices is: “Can these machines be used to perform electronic structure calculations?” In this talk I will discuss the possibility of mapping the electronic structure Hamiltonian to an Ising type Hamiltonian and present the simulation results of the transformed Ising Hamiltonian for small molecules such as H2, He2, HeH+, LiH and H2O. Future directions for scaling up the simulations to larger systems will be also discussed.For further information please contact Brenda Thomas at 773-702-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu. You may also contact the Host, David Mazziotti at 773-834-1762 or via email at damazz@uchicago.edu.
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

October 24, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Robert (Bo) Jacobs, Hiroshima Peace Institute and Hiroshima City University

Social Implication


Physics Colloquium

October 26, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Professor Noah Burns, Stanford University

Synthesis and Study of Unusual Lipids


Chemistry

October 27, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Xiao Wang, Stanford University

RNA-Centered Perspective of Gene Expression in Time and Space


Chemistry

October 30, 2017
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Dr. Kin Chung Fong, Raytheon BBN Technologies

Looking for Relativistic Hydrodynamics in Solid State Physics

Interactions between the Dirac fermions in graphene can lead to
new collective behavior described by hydrodynamics. By listening
to the Johnson noise of the electrons, we are able to probe
simultaneously the thermal and electrical transport of the Dirac fluid
and observe how it departs from Fermi liquid physics. At high
temperature near the neutrality point, we find a strong
enhancement of the thermal conductivity and breakdown of
Wiedemann-Franz law in graphene. This is attributed to the non-
degenerate electrons and holes forming a strongly coupled Dirac
fluid. We shall take an outlook on the hydrodynamic physics
experiments in solid state systems. Ref: Science 351, 1058 (2016)
For further information contact: Host: Dam Thanh Son, 773-834-9032. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or via email to bthomas@uchicago.edu.
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

October 31, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Paramjit S. Arora, New York University

Protein Domain Mimics as Modulators of Protein-Protein Interactions


Chemistry

November 2, 2017
GCIS W301 | Thursday, 1:00 pm

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Chin-Tu Chen, University of Chicago

Biomedicine


Physics Colloquium

November 2, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Yang Qin, University of New Mexico

Design, Preparation and Application of Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Materials


Chemistry

November 3, 2017
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Jiwoong Park, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

November 8, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Rodney Ewing, Stanford University

On-Going Challenges Surrounding Nuclear Waste


Physics Colloquium

November 8, 2017
KPTC 106 | Wednesday, 1:30 pm

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MRSEC / KRUSS Surface Science Seminar

Surface Chemistry Measurements, Applications, and Instrumentation

900AM to 1200PM – talks on theory and principle
1200PM to 100PM – lunch provided by KRUSS
100PM to 500PM – demonstrations of KRUSS instrumentation

JFI Special Seminar

November 9, 2017
GCIS W301 | Thursday, 9:00 am

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Uli Weisner, Cornell University


Molecular Engineering

November 9, 2017
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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James Shorter PhD, University of Pennsylvania

Reversing aberrant phase transitions of RNA-binding proteins connected to ALS and FTD


Biophysical Dynamics

November 14, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Erez Berg, Department of Physics, University of Chicago


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

November 14, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Hod Lipson, Columbia University


Computations in Science

November 15, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Eric Isaacs, University of Chicago

Impact on University Research


Physics Colloquium

November 16, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. John Parkhill, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Notre Dame

Quantum dynamics with Statistical Effects and Statistical Models of Quantum Effects

The capability of electronic structure to calculate the wavefunctions, and even dynamics of large systems has improved dramatically. This has put electronic structure into an uncomfortable regime where statistical effects become as important as the correlation problem. I will discuss our efforts to describe mixed-state electronic dynamics with density matrix equations of motion, and the applications of those theories to ultrafast experiments. Realtime mean field theories such as RT-TDDFT and RT-TDHF dominate applications because of the speed required to access picosecond timescales. Yet TDHF and TDDFT are not accurate enough to properly model resonant driving, which is only one ingredient in ultrafast spectroscopy. In this talk I discuss a simple density-matrix equation of motion implemented as an approximation to RT-TDDFT, which excites properly on resonance. Based on this foundation I compare the non-equilibrium steady states of the correct DFT and a Markovian bath model, with essentially exact results coming from HEOM showing that TDDFT can be used to study driven ultrafast dynamics. I then discuss self-consistency in correlated corrections to TDDFT which have low cost and can be applied to large systems. Statistical sampling of molecular geometries has become an equally important issue, although empirical density functionals, which are the most practical tools for exploring geometries, make an ambiguous mixture of quantum physics and statistical modeling. I will demonstrate purely statistical models of molecular structure, and show that in the near future it is likely that purely empirical models of the PES will have several appealing advantages over empirical hybrids. of quantum mechanical models with statistics.For further information please contact Brenda Thomas at 773-702-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu. You may also contact the Host, David Mazziotti at 773-834-1762 or via email at damazz@uchicago.edu.
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

November 28, 2017
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Emanuela Del Gado, Georgetown University


Computations in Science

November 29, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Bettina Hoerlin and Gino Segrè

Enrico Fermi: The Pope of Physics

Enrico Fermi has been called the last scientist who knew all of physics, having attained the heights of the profession as a theorist and experimentalist. Unique in numerous ways, this 20th century physicist was entirely self-taught; the breadth and depth of his research remain unparalleled. Fermi’s 1938 Nobel Prize was picked up en route in his flight from fascist Italy with his Jewish wife and children to a new life in America. In 1942 he became the lead scientist in the University of Chicago experiment that produced the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction, a key precursor to building the atomic bomb. His role in the success of the Manhattan Project was critical.

This lecture combines Fermi’s personal life with his scientific contributions and illustrates how he was shaped by history and how he, in turn, shaped history. Legendarily apolitical, Fermi was reluctantly involved in American political decision making during the war and afterwards. The many challenges he faced, including the tensions between politics and science, are still relevant today.
Physics Colloquium

November 30, 2017
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Ilya Nemenman, Emory University


Computations in Science

December 6, 2017
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Jay Gambetta, IBM


Molecular Engineering

December 7, 2017
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Physics with A Bang! Holiday Lecture and JFI Open House

Students, families, teachers and especially the curious are invited to attend our annual Holiday Lecture and Open House. See fast, loud, surprising and beautiful physics demos performed by Profs. Heinrich Jaeger and Sidney Nagel. Talk to scientists about their latest discoveries. Participate in hands-on activities related to their research.

Saturday, December 9th, 2017
Kersten Physics Teaching Center
5720 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL

Lecture repeated at 11am and 2pm
Open House and Demo Alley from 12pm-4pm
Lab Tours in the afternoon

Doors for the Lectures open 30 minutes before each show. This will be a first to arrive, first ticketed event. We do not guarantee availibility of seating, but shows will also be streamed live to alternative venues if oversubscribed.
Special JFI Seminar

December 9, 2017
KPTC 106 | Saturday, 11:00 am

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Rachel Segalman, UC Santa Barbara


Molecular Engineering

January 4, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Heinrich Jaeger, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

January 10, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Andrei Tokmakoff, University of Chicago


Molecular Engineering

January 18, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, Georgia Tech


Computations in Science

January 24, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Michael Hagan, Department of Physics and Quantative Biology, Brandeis University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

January 30, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Jens Eggers , University of Bristol


Computations in Science

January 31, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Naomi Halas, Rice University


Molecular Engineering

February 1, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Jonathan A. Rogers, Department of Chemistry, Simpson/Querrey Institute - Northwestern University


The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

February 6, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Haim Diamant, Tel Aviv University


Computations in Science

February 7, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Joaquin Rodriguez-Lopez, University of Illinois


Molecular Engineering

February 15, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Ivan I Smalyukh, University of Colorado Boulder


Computations in Science

February 21, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Jeff Snyder, Northwestern University


Molecular Engineering

March 1, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Joi Ito, MIT Media Lab Director


Molecular Engineering

March 14, 2018
ERC 161 | Wednesday, 11:00 am

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Aleksandra Vojvodic, University of Pennsylvania


Molecular Engineering

March 15, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium - Prof. Ignacio Franco, Department of Chemistry, Rochester University


The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

April 3, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Demetri Psaltis, EPFL


Molecular Engineering

April 5, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Dr. Atac Imamoglu, Department of Physics , ETH Zurich


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

April 17, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Alfred Crosby, University of Massachusetts Amherst


Computations in Science

April 18, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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William Dichtel, Northwestern University


Molecular Engineering

April 19, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Garnet Chan, Department of Chemistry, Princeton University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

April 24, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Ned Wingreen


Computations in Science

May 2, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Ronald Germain


Molecular Engineering

May 3, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Lauren Webb, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas-Austin


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 15, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Douglas Tobias, University of California - Irvine


Molecular Engineering

May 17, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Jin-Quan Yu, Scripps Research Institute


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 22, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Ariel Amir, Harvard


Computations in Science

May 23, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Valeria Molinero


Molecular Engineering

June 7, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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