Focus on Scholarly Communication

Presented by the Royal Society of Chemistry and the University of Chicago Department of Chemistry

"Meet the editor" event, hosted by Dmitri Talapin
Chemistry

December 12, 2017
Kent 114 | Tuesday, 10:00 am

More Information

Announcement

Lea Nienhaus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

From Imaging Excitons at the Nanoscale to Emerging Device Applications

Understanding light-induced processes in materials is critical for tailoring their optical and electronic properties to applications in chemical conversion, light harvesting, or energy transfer. Nanomaterials are prime candidates to study light-matter interactions on both the single-particle and the ensemble level. However, they are prone to defects which can be detrimental to their function in optoelectronic devices. Furthermore, many optoelectronic and photocatalytic systems are based on hybrid interfaces combining both inorganic and organic materials. The exact energy transfer mechanism at these hybrid interfaces is often obscure, particularly when both the macroscopic donor and acceptor materials consist of many separately interacting moieties. Here, I describe the detailed photophysics of a PbS nanocrystal-based light-harvesting device, and further demonstrate a technique for single-particle visualization of absorption in various nanomaterials.
I present exchange-mediated spin-triplet exciton transfer from semiconducting PbS nanocrystals to the triplet state of the organic molecule rubrene. Diffusion-mediated triplet-triplet annihilation in rubrene generates higher-energy emissive spin-singlet states, and shows promise in sub-bandgap sensitization of silicon. We combine transient photoluminescence spectroscopy with a kinetic model to unravel the underlying photophysics of the relevant energy transfer processes occurring in the upconverting device.
To further investigate light-harvesting at the nanoscale, I employ single molecule absorption detected by scanning tunneling microscopy. This technique is based on a change in the local density of states upon absorption, and thus visualizes the localized excitation. Taking advantage of Stark shifts caused by the electric field in the STM, different energy levels can be shifted into resonance with the excitation wavelength.
Chemistry

December 12, 2017
Kent 101 | Tuesday, 1:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

Professor Tohru Fukuyama, Nagoya University

Synthetic Studies on Tetrodotoxin

Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is one of the most famous marine natural products, which is found most notably in the liver and ovary of puffer fish. It is the toxin responsible for the fatal food poisoning caused by improperly cooked puffer fish in Japan. This compound also serves as an important biochemical tool in neurophysiology since it exhibits neurotoxicity by selectively blocking sodium channels of excitable cell membranes. Despite its relatively small molecular size, TTX possesses eight contiguous stereogenic centers in its polyfunctionalized dioxaadamantane skeleton including an orthoester and a guanidine moieties. This fascinating molecule has been a popular target for many synthetic chemists although only a few successful total syntheses have been reported to date. We initiated our synthetic studies on TTX in the hope of identifying the exact location of sodium channels where TTX blocks. Recent progress of our approach will be discussed in the lecture.
Chemistry

December 18, 2017
Kent 101 | Monday, 4:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Rachel Segalman, UC Santa Barbara


Molecular Engineering

January 4, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

Dr. Ryan Hadt, Argonne National Laboratory,

Structure/Function Correlations Over Heterogeneous Catalysis and Bioinorganic Chemistry

This talk covers recent combinations of spectroscopy and theory to develop relationships between molecular structure and function within specific areas of heterogeneous catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry as well as areas of their intersection. Focus within heterogeneous catalysis is on the formation, characterization and reactivity of high-valent intermediates involved in the chemistries of alternative fuel (e.g., the oxygen evolution reaction and the conversion of methane to methanol). The characterization of these intermediates allows for a direct correlation between active sites in heterogeneous catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry. Additional focus within bioinorganic chemistry is on demonstrating, understanding and quantifying entatic states (in the electronic ground state) and their contributions to controlling the function of electron transfer active sites. These concepts are further extended to the reactivity of transition metal excited states (e.g., copper photosensitizers). Lastly, the nature of the entatic state is defined in detail for cytochrome c, with emphasis on understanding the protein contribution to the active site Fe–S(Met) bond strength and how the energetics of the local protein fold allow for bifunctionality in energy transduction (electron transfer) and apoptosis (lipid peroxidation).


Chemistry

January 8, 2018
Kent 102 | Monday, 2:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Marco Allodi PhD, Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago

Visualizing Chemical Dynamics Across Nanoscale Interfaces


Biophysical Dynamics

January 9, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Heinrich Jaeger, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

January 10, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

Nick Bultinck, Princeton University

Tensor network trial wave functions for topological phases

The construction of trial wave functions has proven itself to be very useful for understanding strongly interacting quantum many-body systems. Two famous examples of such trial wave functions are the resonating valence bond state proposed
by Anderson and the Laughlin wave function, which have provided an (intuitive) understanding of respectively spin liquids and fractional Quantum Hall states. Tensor network states are another, more recent, class of such trial wave functions which are based on entanglement properties of local, gapped systems. In this talk I will discuss the use of tensor network states for topological phases, and what we can learn from this approach. I will consider one- and two-dimensional systems, consisting of both spins and fermions. The focus will be on the different connections that can be made using tensor networks, such as connecting theory to numerics, and physical properties to ground state entanglement.
Kadanoff Seminar

January 16, 2018
PRC 201 | Tuesday, 1:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Andrei Tokmakoff, University of Chicago


Molecular Engineering

January 18, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, Georgia Tech


Computations in Science

January 24, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Michael Hagan, Department of Physics and Quantative Biology, Brandeis University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

January 30, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Jens Eggers , University of Bristol


Computations in Science

January 31, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Naomi Halas, Rice University


Molecular Engineering

February 1, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Jonathan A. Rogers, Department of Chemistry, Simpson/Querrey Institute - Northwestern University


The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

February 6, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Haim Diamant, Tel Aviv University


Computations in Science

February 7, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

Joaquin Rodriguez-Lopez, University of Illinois


Molecular Engineering

February 15, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

Ivan I Smalyukh, University of Colorado Boulder


Computations in Science

February 21, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Jeff Snyder, Northwestern University


Molecular Engineering

March 1, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Joi Ito, MIT Media Lab Director


Molecular Engineering

March 14, 2018
ERC 161 | Wednesday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

Aleksandra Vojvodic, University of Pennsylvania


Molecular Engineering

March 15, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium - Prof. Ignacio Franco, Department of Chemistry, Rochester University


The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

April 3, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Demetri Psaltis, EPFL


Molecular Engineering

April 5, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Dr. Atac Imamoglu, Department of Physics , ETH Zurich


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

April 17, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Alfred Crosby, University of Massachusetts Amherst


Computations in Science

April 18, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

William Dichtel, Northwestern University


Molecular Engineering

April 19, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Garnet Chan, Department of Chemistry, Princeton University


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

April 24, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Martin van Hecke, Leiden Institute of Physics


Computations in Science

April 25, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

Ned Wingreen


Computations in Science

May 2, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Ronald Germain


Molecular Engineering

May 3, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Lauren Webb, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas-Austin


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 15, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Douglas Tobias, University of California - Irvine


Molecular Engineering

May 17, 2018
ERC 201 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

The Tuesday JFI Seminar - CLOSS LECTURE - Prof. Jin-Quan Yu, Scripps Research Institute


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

May 22, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Ariel Amir, Harvard


Computations in Science

May 23, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

More Information

Announcement

IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Valeria Molinero


Molecular Engineering

June 7, 2018
ERC 161 | Thursday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

Top