John Teufel, NIST/Boulder

Title TBA


Physics Colloquium

May 6, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 3:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

William Baker (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill)

Architecture, Structure and the Geometry of Equilibrium

Geometry is at the intersection of architecture and structure; structures are driven by physics. In this talk, we will explore how the geometry of buildings and bridges respond to the forces of nature. We will even show how one can derive some basic building forms using only a pencil, ruler and straight edge.

Use this link to register: https://uchicago.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAvceirpjkrHdAmjTAxgtrgzJo23cRGjdAA
Already registered? Use the link that was emailed to you.

The lecture series is supported by the College Curricular Innovation Fund and organized in cooperation with the Art, Science + Culture Initiative at The University of Chicago. For information on the lecturers, see the attached pdf file.
Physics & Contemporary Architecture Guest Lecture Series

May 6, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 5:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

ze demon is in za detailed balance,

verstest-du?

meet: 12:00
Greet: 12:01
eat: 12:02
...
treat: 12:15
MRSEC Baglunch

May 7, 2021
Zoom | Friday, 12:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Gary Horowitz, University of California, Santa Barbara

Black Holes and Spacetime Singularities

One of the most profound predictions of Einstein’s theory of general relativity is the existence of black holes. Despite recent data coming from gravitational wave detectors and the Event Horizon Telescope, there are still fundamental mysteries about these objects. I will start by describing some of these mysteries and recent progress toward understanding them, but then turn to something even more exotic. Inside black holes are spacetime singularities: regions where general relativity breaks down and must be replaced by a quantum theory of gravity. It may be possible for these singularities to also occur outside black holes, where they could be seen by distant observers. I will describe some attempts to find examples of these so-called “naked” singularities.
Physics Colloquium

May 13, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 3:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

David Benjamin (The Living)

Living Materials


Physics & Contemporary Architecture Guest Lecture Series

May 13, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 5:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Eric Shaqfeh, Stanford

Rigid or flexible particles suspended in viscoelastic fluids are ubiquitous in the food industry (e.g. pastes), industrial molding applications (all composites and 3-D printed parts), the energy industry (e.g. fracking fluids), and biological fluids (i.e. swimming of bacteria in mucous). The mathematical description of these suspensions is in its infancy. For example, the foundational work in Newtonian suspensions was accomplished by Einstein in 1905 , but that same calculation in an elastic fluid appeared in 2018 (!) However, the real breakthrough has been the development of a computational simulation of such viscoelastic suspensions, with particle level resolution. These simulations will allow the principles which govern the simplest flows of such suspensions, which are now only beginning to be understood, to become elucidated in the next decade. I will describe a series of foundational problems that have now been analyzed using these new computational methods including comparison to existing experiments. I will then discuss those problems that represent “the next steps” in the field.
MRSEC Baglunch

May 14, 2021
Zoom | Friday, 12:00 pm

More Information

Announcement

Richard Beyler, Portland State U.

History of Science: Special Colloquium on J. Franck


Physics Colloquium

May 20, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 3:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Jeanne Gang (Studio Gang)

Strength in the Fluid, Soft, and Yielding


Physics & Contemporary Architecture Guest Lecture Series

May 20, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 5:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Jennifer Ogilvie, University of Michigan

Shedding New Light on Photosynthetic Systems Using Multidimensional Spectroscopies

The primary events of photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales with high quantum efficiency. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic systems remains an outstanding challenge that has the potential to impact our design of artificial light-harvesting materials. I will demonstrate how multidimensional spectroscopy can address open questions about photosynthetic systems and describe our recent progress in developing and using these tools to probe the mechanisms of ultrafast energy conversion in natural photosynthetic systems. Host: Melissa Bodine, mbodine@uchicago.edu. Persons who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at bthomas@uchicago.edu.
JFI Zoom Seminar

May 25, 2021
Zoom | Tuesday, 3:45 pm

More Information

Announcement

Walter E Massey


Physics Colloquium

May 27, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 3:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Ethan Silva (Performance Structures)

Materializing Visions


Physics & Contemporary Architecture Guest Lecture Series

May 27, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 5:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Adam Kaufman, JILA/University of Colorado


JFI Zoom Seminar

June 1, 2021
Zoom | Tuesday, 3:45 pm

More Information

Announcement

Andre de Gouvea, Northwestern

Title TBA (Neutrino theory)


Physics Colloquium

June 3, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 3:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Sung Kim, Howard University


Physics Colloquium

June 10, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 3:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Myriam Sarachik, City College of New York


Physics Colloquium

October 21, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 3:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Sidney Redner, Santa Fe Institute


Physics Colloquium

October 28, 2021
Zoom | Thursday, 3:30 pm

More Information

Announcement

Ahmad (Mo) Khalil, Boston University


Molecular Engineering

November 20, 2021
Zoom | Saturday, 11:00 am

More Information

Announcement

Top