Macropolis: A Chicagoland Polymer Symposium

Join us for this celebration of soft matter science occurring in the greater Chicago area!

This inaugural polymer science symposium is planned as the first of many of its kind. The event, to be held at the University of Chicago this year, will be hosted at Northwestern University for the next symposium.

Plenary lectures will feature faculty, postdocs, and students from both universities. Registration is free but required for lunch. For the full schedule and to register, visit the event's microsite.
Special Event

September 20, 2019
ERC 161 | Friday, 9:00 am

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Closs Lecture: Professor Dr. Benjamin List: Max-Planck-Institute

Very Strong and Confined Chiral Acids: Universal Catalysts for Asymmetric Synthesis?


Closs Lecture

September 27, 2019
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:45 pm

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Daniel Fisher, Stanford University


Computations in Science

October 2, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Arvind Murugan, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

October 9, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Rebecca Kramer-Bottiglio, Yale University


Computations in Science

October 16, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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David Schwab, CUNY


Computations in Science

October 23, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Jennifer Prescher, University of California, Irvine

Spying on Cellular Communication with Chemical Tools and Noninvasive Imaging

Cellular networks drive diverse aspects of human biology. Breakdowns in cell-to-cell communication also underlie numerous pathologies. While cellular interactions play key roles in human health and disease, the mechanisms by which cells transact information in vivo are not completely understood. The number of cells types involved, the timing and location of their interactions, the molecular cues exchanged, and the long-term fates of the cells remain poorly characterized in most cases. This is due, in part, to a lack of tools for observing collections of cells in their native habitats. My group is developing novel imaging probes to “spy” on cells and decipher their communications in vivo. Examples of these probes, along with their application to studies of cancer progression and host-pathogen interactions, will be discussed.
Chemistry

October 25, 2019
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:45 pm

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Ben Nachman, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


Computations in Science

October 30, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Orit Peleg, University of Colorado


Computations in Science

November 13, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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W. Benjamin Rogers, Brandeis University


Computations in Science

November 20, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Irmgard Bischofberger, MIT


Computations in Science

December 4, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Bob Rosner, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

January 8, 2020
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Wim van Rees, MIT


Computations in Science

January 15, 2020
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Rebecca Schulman, Johns Hopkins University


Computations in Science

January 22, 2020
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Justin Burton, Emory University


Computations in Science

February 5, 2020
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Changes of state: a symposium in honor of Thomas F Rosenbaum

This May, please join us for a celebration of the life and work of Thomas F Rosenbaum.

Special Symposium

May 1, 2020
KPTC 106 | Friday, 9:00 am

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Sabetta Matsumoto, Georgia Tech


Computations in Science

May 6, 2020
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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