Professor Michael J. Hatridge, Department of Physics, University of Pittsburgh

Qubit Measurement with Two-Mode Squeezed Light

High fidelity qubit measurement is essential for scalable, fault-tolerant quantum computing. In superconducting circuits, qubit readout with fidelity above 99% has been achieved by using a quantum-limited parametric amplifier such as the Josephson Parametric Converter (JPC) as the first stage amplifier. However, the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of such readout is fundamentally limited by quantum fluctuations in the coherent readout pulse. Alternatively, readout with squeezed light can be used to reduce fluctuation along certain quadratures and thus improve the SNR. In this talk, we demonstrate a readout scheme with two-mode squeezed light both produced and amplified by JPCs in an interferometer unbalanced by a transmon qubit/cavity. This configuration has been predicted to improve the SNR compared to readout with both coherent states and single-mode squeezed light. We have demonstrated a 50% improvement in SNR compared to coherent state readout, and find that the system actual works best when when we deliberately break the path for signals in the system, so that only the fluctuations passing through it interfere. We'll also discuss the prospects for placing qubits on both arms of the interferometer and performing measurements which generate remote entanglement between them.
JFI Special Seminar

October 22, 2018
GCIS E223 | Monday, 3:30 pm

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Chemistry Colloquium: Professor Naoto Chatani, Osaka University

Development of New Catalytic Reactions Involving the Activation of Traditionally Inert Bonds

Organic molecules contain a variety of chemical bonds. Organic synthesis involves the cleavage of a chemical bond and the formation of a new chemical bond. However, not all of the chemical bonds in organic molecules have been used in organic synthesis. Thus, organic synthesis is heavily dependent on the reactivity of chemical bonds. If so-called unreactive bonds were to be used directly in organic synthesis, new possibilities for developing new synthetic methodologies would arise. We have utilized, not only the activation of C-H bonds, but also the activation of unreactive single bonds, such as C-C, C-O, C-N, and C-F bonds, and the activation of C-C triple bonds and C-O double bonds, in our quest to develop new types of transformations that will lead to further diversification in the field of organic synthesis.
Chemistry

October 22, 2018
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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Yuhai Tu, PhD, IBM

Nonequilibrium physics in biochemical oscillations

A central problem in systems biology is how living systems manage to perform precise functions (development, replication, signaling, etc.) by using inherently noisy biochemical networks. What are the molecular mechanisms for control? What are the design principles for the underlying biochemical networks? What are the energy costs for regulation? In this talk, we will present some recent results to address these general questions in biochemical oscillatory systems. We will discuss the molecular mechanism and energy cost for enhancing the accuracy and synchronization of biochemical oscillators [1]; and the design principles for oscillatory biochemical networks to achieve both high entrainability and low phase fluctuations [2].
[1] “The free-energy cost of accurate biochemical oscillations”, Y. Cao, H. Wang, Q. Ouyang, and Yuhai Tu, Nature Physics, 11, 772, 2015.
[2] “Design principles for enhancing phase sensitivity and suppressing phase fluctuations simultaneously in biochemical oscillatory systems”, C. Fei, Y. Cao, Q. Ouyang, and Yuhai Tu, Nature Communications, doi:10.1038/s41467-018-03826-4, 2018.
Biophysical Dynamics

October 23, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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Professor Marc Fontecave, Collège de France

Carbon Dioxide to Fuels: from Enzymes to Bioinspired Catalysts


Chemistry

October 23, 2018
Kent 120 | Tuesday, 1:15 pm

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Prof. Michael Grünwald, Department of Chemistry, University of Utah

Orientational Order in Self-Assembled Nanocrystal Superlattices

Self-assembly of nanocrystals into functional materials requires precise control over nanoparticle interactions in solution, which are dominated by organic ligands that densely cover the surface of nanocrystals. In this talk, I will present a computational study of ligand effects in the self-assembly of small, non-spherical nanocrystals. We focus on nanocrystals with cuboctahedral and truncated octahedral shape and determine their self-assembly behavior as a function of ligand length and solvent quality. Our model, which is based on a coarse-grained description of ligands and a schematic representation of solvent effects, reproduces the experimentally observed superstructures, including recently observed superlattices with partial and short-ranged orientational alignment of nanocrystals. We show that small differences in nanoparticle shape, ligand length and coverage, and solvent conditions, can lead to markedly different self-assembled superstructures due to subtle changes in the free energetics of ligand interactions. Our results help explain the large variety of different reported superlattices self-assembled from seemingly similar particles and can serve as a guide for the targeted self-assembly of nanocrystal superstructures. Host: Suri Vaikuntanathan, 2-7256 or via email at svaikunt@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

October 23, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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MRSEC Surface Metrology Workshop

in cooperation with Olympus


8:30 AM : Breakfast
9:00 AM: Introduction to LEXT OLS5000 Laser Confocal Microscope, Guangnan Meng, PhD
10:00 AM: Coffee Break
10:15 AM: MRSEC Student Talks: Applications
11:30 AM: A Few Things You Need to Know About Surface Roughness: Guangnan Meng, PhD
12:15 PM: Lunch (registration required)
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM: Sample Demonstrations and Discussions


Please register online for free lunch and sample demos
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9QBQFRN
MRSEC Workshop

October 24, 2018
GCIS W301 | Wednesday, 9:00 am

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Pedro Saenz, MIT


Computations in Science

October 24, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Professor Marc Fontecave, Collège de France

FeS Clusters and Thiolation Reactions: Lessons from tRNA- and Protein-modifying Enzymes


Chemistry

October 25, 2018
Kent 120 | Thursday, 1:15 pm

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William Irvine, University of Chicago


Physics Colloquium

October 25, 2018
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Professor Jiaoyang Jiang, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Specificity, Function and Regulation of Protein O-GIcNAc Modification

The N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification is an essential glycosylation that has been identified on over 1,000 proteins. It dynamically modulates protein functions and regulates numerous biological processes in physiology and disease. O-GlcNAc modification is added by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and removed by O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Despite recent progress, challenges remain to decipher the biological roles of O-GlcNAc modification and its regulation by OGT and OGA on a broad range of substrates that lack an apparent sequence motif. In this talk, I will present our recently developed structural biology and chemical biology approaches to start revealing the specificity, function and regulation of O-GlcNAc modification.
Chemistry

October 26, 2018
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:15 pm

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Professor Matthew Kanan, Stanford University


Chemistry

October 29, 2018
Kent 120 | Monday, 1:15 pm

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Yizhi You, Princeton Center for Theoretical Physics

Fracton phase of matter: Lattice models, gauge theories and realizations

Fracton phase of matter shares many features of topological order, including long-range entangled ground states and non-trivial braiding statistics. At the same time, fracton phase contains subextensive ground-state degeneracy and the restricted mobility of quasiparticle which exclude itself from the TQFT paradigm. In this talk, I start from several fracton lattice models and demonstrate their relation with gauged subsystem symmetric SPT phase. Further, I will present a theoretical framework for higher Chern-Simons theory in 3D which realizes a deconfined U(1) fracton phase. In the end, I propose an experiment platform for realizing diverse fracton stabilizer codes based on interacting nanowires, which enables us to fabricate a zoology of fracton states and thus provides a powerful novel avenue to the realization of stable quantum memory and fault-tolerant quantum computing.
Kadanoff Seminar

October 30, 2018
PRC 201 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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The Tuesday JFI Seminar - Prof. Christos Panagopoulos, Nanyang Techenilogical University, Singapore

Tunable Room Temparature Skyrmions

The electric field experienced by a travelling electron translates, in its rest frame, to a magnetic field proportional to its velocity – a relativistic effect which is notable in crystalline lattices with heavy atoms. The Zeeman interaction between the electron spin and this effective magnetic field is equivalent to the coupling of the electronic spin and momentum degrees of freedom, known as spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Importantly, SOC effects are greatly enhanced in reduced dimensions: inversion symmetry is broken at the surface or interface, and the resultant electric field couples to the spin of itinerant electrons. Host: Timothy Berkelbach, 4-9879 or via email to berkelbach@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.

The states induced by engineering SOC and inversion symmetry breaking in magnetic materials open a broad perspective, with impact in the technology of spin topology. For example, in conventional ferromagnets the exchange interaction aligns spins and the anisotropy determines energetically preferred orientations. Meanwhile, the interaction generated by SOC and broken inversion symmetry induces a relative tilt between neighbouring spins. Magnetic skyrmions – finite-size two-dimensional (2D) ’whirls’ of electron spin – form due to the competition between these ‘winding’ & ‘aligning’ exchange interactions.

Skyrmions have several compelling attributes as prototype memory elements, namely their (1) nontrivial spin topology, protecting them from disorder and thermal fluctuations, (2) small size and self-organization into dense lattices and (3) particle-like dynamics, manipulation and addressability. Using a novel materials architecture we developed recently, I will address quantifiable insights towards understanding skyrmion stability and dynamics, and directions for exploiting their properties in nanoscale devices at room temperature.
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

October 30, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Timothy C. Berkelbach, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

October 31, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Saebyeok Jeong, Stony Brook


Theory Seminar

October 31, 2018
PRC 201 | Wednesday, 1:30 pm

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Marcos Santander, The University of Alabama


Physics Colloquium

November 1, 2018
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Andy LiWang, PhD, Quantitative and Systems Biol, UC Merced

Can proteins tell time?

Circadian clocks arose in organisms as an adaptation to the rotation of the earth. These clocks produce involuntary anticipation of sunrise and sunset by generating a succession of biochemical phases. In this talk, the mechanism of a model system, that of cyanobacteria, will be described. Briefly, it depends on phosphorylation, long-range allostery, dynamics, and protein metamorphosis. Because a simple mixture of clock proteins and ATP generate a persistent macroscopic rhythm, the mechanism of the clock can be studied in real time as it ticks. Now, signal transduction pathways have been reconstituted with the oscillator so that rhythmic transmission of clock signals can be studied in vitro.
Biophysical Dynamics

November 6, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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Luca Delacretaz, Stanford University

Bounds on transport and thermalization from positivity


Kadanoff Seminar

November 6, 2018
PRC 215 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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1st Tuesday Colloquium - Prof. Mark D. Ediger, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Exploring the Limits of Amorphous Packing with Ultrastable Glasses

Glasses formed by cooling a liquid inherit both their structure and their limited stability from the liquid state. In contrast, glasses prepared by vapor deposition can avoid both of these limitations. By utilizing the high mobility present near the free surface of many organic glasses, vapor deposition can build glasses with low enthalpy, high density, and high thermal stability. Based upon their position on the potential energy landscape, these materials approach “ideal glass” packing that otherwise could only be achieved by annealing a liquid-cooled glass for thousands or millions of years. Vapor deposition of organic semiconductors produces glasses with improved properties for organic electronics, including the ability to produce anisotropic glasses with a wide range of structures. Remarkably, this “anti-epitaxy” process uses the free surface structure as its template, rather than the substrate structure. Recent work has shown that optimizing vapor deposition can produce organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) that are more efficient and have extended lifetimes. Host: Thomas Witten, 2-2-0948 or via email to t-witten@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.
The 1st Tuesday JFI Colloquium

November 6, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Brad Marston, Brown University


Computations in Science

November 7, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Shanhui Fan

Professor Shanhui Fan from Stanford University will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

November 7, 2018
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Helen Quinn, SLAC

Science, Engineering and Art as well –why it is hard to teach science well

will reflect on what we know about teaching science for k-12 students and for undergraduates, how we know it, and what it tells us about good teaching. To teach well you must engineer the right learning conditions with careful design goals for what is to be learned, you must understand both the subject area you wish to teach and something of what research on learning tells us about critical aspects of learning that area (this is known as pedagogical content knowledge or content knowledge for teaching) and then you must be a skilled improvisational performance artist to pull off the lessons as intended, responding to the needs of students who enter your classroom with a wide range of prior knowledge, engaging them all as active participants in the learning.

This talk is based on work I have been doing in the area of science education since my retirement in 2010 from physics research, summarizing what I have learned in the process. Illinois and approximately 30 other states have adopted new science standards based on the NAS study “A Framework for k-12 science education” that I led. This study tried to capture the learning about learning from science education research as well as to shift the goals for what needs to be learned. I will discuss how it, together with research studies focused on teaching physics or other sciences at the undergraduate level, suggests changes in undergraduate teaching approaches as well.
Physics Colloquium

November 8, 2018
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Zhen Gu, PhD, UCLA

Leverage Physiology for Bioresponsive Drug Delivery

Spurred by recent advances in materials chemistry, molecular pharmaceutics & nanobiotechnology, stimuli-responsive “smart” systems offer opportunities for precisely delivering drugs in dose-, spatial- & temporal-controlled manners. In this talk, I will discuss our ongoing efforts in developing physiological signal-triggered bio-responsive drug delivery systems. I will first present the glucose-responsive synthetic systems for biomimetic delivery of insulin for diabetes treatment. Bio-responsive microneedle patches and vesicle fusion-mediated synthetic beta cells will be emphasized.
I will further discuss the local & targeted delivery of immunomodulatory therapeutics for enhanced cancer therapy. Our latest study utilizing platelets and injectable gels for targeted/local delivery of immune checkpoint inhibitors will be specifically introduced.
Biophysical Dynamics

November 13, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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Oni Basu, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

November 14, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Chen-Te Ma, National Taiwan University

Bell’s Inequality, Generalized Concurrence and Quantum Entanglement

We demonstrate an alternative evaluation of quantum entanglement by measuring maximum violation of Bell's inequality without performing a partial trace operation in an n-qubit system by bridging maximum violation of Bell's inequality and a generalized concurrence of a pure state. This proposal is realized when one subsystem only contains one qubit and a quantum state is a linear combination of two product states. Finally, a relation of the generalized concurrence of a pure state and the maximum violation of Bell's inequality is also demonstrated in a 2n-qubit state.
Kadanoff Seminar

November 15, 2018
PRC 201 | Thursday, 2:00 pm

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Giorgio Gratta, Stanford University


Physics Colloquium

November 15, 2018
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Professor Matthew Bogyo, Stanford University

Chemical Tools for Identification and Imaging of Hydrolases Involved in the Pathogenesis of Cancer and Infectious Disease

Hydrolases are enzymes that often play pathogenic roles in many common human diseases such as cancer, asthma, arthritis, atherosclerosis and infection by pathogens. Therefore, tools that can be used to dynamically monitor their activity can be used as diagnostic agents, as imaging contrast agents and for the identification of novel enzymes and drug leads. In this presentation, I will describe our efforts to design and synthesize small molecule probes that produce a fluorescent signal upon binding to a hydrolase target. In the first part of the presentation, I will discuss probes targeting the cysteine cathepsins and their application to real-time fluorescence guided tumor resection and other diagnostic imaging applications. In the second half of the presentation, I will present our efforts to identify novel hydrolases in the pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus that could be targeted to enable both treatment and non-invasive imaging of disease progression.
Chemistry

November 19, 2018
Kent 120 | Monday, 4:00 pm

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Gregory R. Bowman, PhD, Washington University

Identifying & Exploiting Protein Shape-shifting

A protein is a dynamic shape-shifter whose function is determined by the set of different structures it adopts. Unfortunately, it is often impossible to experimentally characterize most of these structures with the atomic resolution one would like in order to gain mechanistic insight or design drugs and mutations. The Bowman lab is combining enhanced sampling methods, such as Markov state models (MSMs), with biophysical experiments to overcome this limitation. Using this integrative approach, we are coming to a better understanding of how allosteric signals are transmitted between distant parts of a protein. We are also uncovering cryptic pockets that are absent in available experimental structures and provide new targets for drug development. To test our insights, we are designing and experimentally characterizing small molecules and mutations that exert allosteric control over distant functional sites. Examples of ongoing projects include (1) understanding how mutations give rise to antibiotic resistance, (2) designing allosteric drugs to combat antibiotic resistant infections, (3) understanding allosteric networks in G proteins and designing allosteric anti-cancer drugs, and (4) understanding and interfering with the mechanisms of Ebola infection.
Biophysical Dynamics

November 20, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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Ethan Garner, PhD, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Center for Systems Biology, Harvard


Biophysical Dynamics

November 27, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 12:00 pm

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Prof. Zahra Fakhraai, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

November 27, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Felice Frankel

More Than Pretty Pictures

Graphics, images and figures — visual representations of scientific data and concepts — are critical components of science and engineering research. They communicate in ways that words cannot. They can clarify or strengthen an argument and spur interest into the research process.

But it is important to remember that a visual representation of a scientific concept or data is a re-presentation and not the thing itself –– some interpretation or translation is always involved. Just as writing a journal article, one must carefully plan what to “say,” and in what order to “say it.” The process of making a visual representation requires you to clarify your thinking and improve your ability to communicate with others.

In this talk, I will show my own approach to creating depictions in science and engineering—the successes and failures. Included will be a discussion about how far can we go when “enhancing” science images.
Computations in Science

November 28, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Andrei Parnachev


Theory Seminar

November 28, 2018
PRC 201 | Wednesday, 1:30 pm

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Prof. Christophe Delerue, IEMN- CNRS, Paris


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

December 4, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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David Lubensky, University of Michigan


Computations in Science

December 5, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Physics with A Bang! Holiday Lecture and JFI Open House

Students, families, teachers and especially the curious are invited to attend our annual Holiday Lecture and Open House. See fast, loud, surprising and beautiful physics demos performed by Profs. Heinrich Jaeger and Sidney Nagel. Talk to scientists about their latest discoveries. Participate in hands-on activities related to their research.

Saturday, December 8th, 2018
Kersten Physics Teaching Center
5720 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL

Lecture repeated at 11am and 2pm
Open House and Demo Alley from 12pm-4pm
Lab Tours in the afternoon

Doors for the Lectures open 30 minutes before each show. Please note: there will be no online registrations, and will be a first to arrive, first ticketed event. We do not guarantee availibility of seating, but shows will also be streamed live to alternate venues. Those needing special assistance, please send an email to ecs@uchicago.edu.
Special JFI Seminar

December 8, 2018
KPTC 106 | Saturday, 11:00 am

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Prof. Sean T. Roberts, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas-Austin


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

December 11, 2018
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Chiara Daraio, Caltech


Computations in Science

December 12, 2018
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Margaret Gardel, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

January 16, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Jörn Dunkel, MIT


Computations in Science

February 13, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Greg Voth, Wesleyan University


Computations in Science

February 20, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Hana El-Samad, University of California, San Francisco


Computations in Science

March 20, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Alberto Salleo

Professor Alberto Salleo from Stanford University will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

March 20, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Greg Bewley, Cornell University


Computations in Science

April 3, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Oskar Hallatschek, UC Berkeley


Computations in Science

April 10, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Rohit Karnik

Professor Rohit Karnik from Massachusetts Institute of Technology will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

April 10, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Nikta Fakhri, MIT


Computations in Science

April 17, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Detlef Lohse, University of Twente


Computations in Science

April 24, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Jeffrey Moore

Professor Jeffrey Moore from University of Illinois will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

April 24, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Pankaj Mehta, Boston University


Computations in Science

May 1, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Thierry Emonet, Yale University


Computations in Science

May 8, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Darrell Irvine

Professor Darrell Irvine from Massachusetts Institute of Technology will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

May 8, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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David Lentik, Stanford


Computations in Science

May 15, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Joshua Shaevitz, Princeton University


Computations in Science

May 22, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Sven Rogge

Professor Sven Rogge from the University of New South Wales will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

May 22, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Xiaoming Mao, University of Michigan


Computations in Science

May 29, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Ralph Colby

Professor Ralph Colby from Penn State University will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

June 5, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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