Kadanoff seminar: Zohar Nussinov, Washington University in St. Louis

Thermalization bounds, long range correlations, and a universal collapse of the viscosities of supercooled liquids

We will derive bounds on the equilibration times in open and closed systems. For open systems, we will find that thermalization times cannot, typically, be shorter than Planck's constant divided by the temperature; a more general (and accurate) relation involving the heat capacities will be explained. For closed systems, the inequalities that we will obtain suggest that non-adiabatically driven systems may display long range correlations. We will explain how these long range correlations appear in certain soluble models in general spatial dimensions and relate these correlations to the geometry of state manifolds. We will describe how experimental measurements of equilibrated systems may be used to infer the properties of eigenstates of many body Hamiltonians. We will then piece these results together to predict the viscosity and relaxation times of supercooled liquids and glasses. These predictions will be compared to the viscosities and dielectric relaxation times of glass formers of all known types. The comparison shows that the viscosities/relaxation times of all known supercooled liquids collapse onto a universal curve with only one (nearly uniform) liquid dependent parameter over 16 decades. The collapsed universal curve is that predicted by the theory.
Kadanoff Seminar

February 18, 2019
PRC 201 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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Ibrahim Cisse, Physics, MIT,

Super-resolution imaging of transcription in live mammalian cells


Biophysical Dynamics

February 19, 2019
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 1:00 pm

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Kenneth Schweizer, The Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign

Activated Dynamics in Glass Forming Colloidal, Molecular and Polymeric Liquids: From Structural Relaxation to Functional Materials

Understanding the spectacular slowing down of relaxation and mass transport in glass-forming liquids over 14 or more decades in time remains a grand scientific challenge. Moreover, many advanced materials employ viscous liquids, gels or amorphous solids in applications such as separation membranes, barrier coatings, ion-conductors and functional nanocomposites. I will present an overview of our work the past 5 years on developing a predictive, microscopic, force-based theory for activated relaxation that spans the Arrhenius, dynamic crossover and deeply supercooled regimes of colloidal, molecular and polymeric systems. The theory is based on density fluctuations as the slow variable and the trajectory-level concept of a dynamic free energy that controls intermittent motion. The irreversible re-arrangement event is of a mixed local-nonlocal character involving large amplitude hopping on the cage scale coupled to longer range collective elastic distortion of the surrounding liquid. Connections between thermodynamics, structure, dynamic elasticity and slow relaxation emerge naturally. Chemical complexity is treated based on a physically motivated coarse-graining idea that identifies a small number of key molecular parameters. Quantitative, no-fit-parameter comparisons with experiment will be presented. Generalization to the materials science problem of penetrant diffusion (gas, aromatic molecules) in polymer liquids and glasses, inspired by ideas from interstitial and polaron transport in solids, will also be discussed. Ongoing related theoretical extensions include quiescent and nonequilibrium relaxation and mechanics in attractive glass and gel-forming polymers, colloids and hybrid nanocomposite systems, large dynamical gradients in thin films, emergent anisotropic entanglement constraints and rheology of (bio)polymers, and active matter. Host: Suri Vaikuntanathan at 2-7256 or via email at svaikunt@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu.
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

February 19, 2019
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Greg Voth, Wesleyan University

A new view of the dynamics of turbulence from measurements of rotations of particles with complex shapes

Non-spherical particles in turbulent flows are important in a wide range of problems including ice crystals in clouds, fibers in paper-making, marine plankton, and additives for turbulent drag reduction. We have developed experimental methods for precise tracking of the position and orientation of non-spherical particles in intense 3D turbulence. Using 3D printed particles, we can fabricate a wide range of shapes and explore how particle orientation and rotation are affected by particle shape. We find particles are strongly aligned by the turbulence. A simple picture in which particles are aligned by the fluid stretching they experience explains many of the key observations about how particles align and rotate. This same picture sheds new light on some old problems about how vorticity aligns with the strain rate tensor in turbulent flows. It has also allowed us to create a fascinating particle shape which we call a chiral dipole that shows a preferential rotation direction in isotropic turbulent flow.
Computations in Science

February 20, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Marc Kamionkowski, Johns Hopkins University

Heretical hypotheses in the hunt for dark matter

We have known for a reasonable fraction of a century that most of the matter in the Universe is dark, and for several decades that it cannot be baryonic. The nature of this dark matter has, however, been elusive. The prevailing weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP) hypothesis that have long been theorists preferred guess faces considerable pressure from an array of null searches, and this has led theorists to consider previously unpalatable alternatives. I will discuss the rise, and possible fall, of an idea that connected LIGO’s discovery of black-hole binaries to dark matter. I will also discuss recent ideas (motivated in part by an intriguing recent experimental result) that involve particles with enhanced couplings to ordinary matter.
Physics Colloquium

February 21, 2019
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Jennifer Prescher, University of California, Irvine

Spying on Cellular Communication with Chemical Tools and Noninvasive Imaging

Cellular networks drive diverse aspects of human biology. Breakdowns in cell-to-cell communication also underlie numerous pathologies. While cellular interactions play key roles in human health and disease, the mechanisms by which cells transact information in vivo are not completely understood. The number of cells types involved, the timing and location of their interactions, the molecular cues exchanged, and the long-term fates of the cells remain poorly characterized in most cases. This is due, in part, to a lack of tools for observing collections of cells in their native habitats. My group is developing novel imaging probes to “spy” on cells and decipher their communications in vivo. Examples of these probes, along with their application to studies of cancer progression and host-pathogen interactions, will be discussed.
Chemistry

February 22, 2019
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:45 pm

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Daniel Jafferis, Harvard University


Kadanoff Seminar

February 25, 2019
PRC 201 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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Arjun Yodh, The Department of Physics & Astronomy


The Tuesday JFI Seminar

February 26, 2019
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Xiang Cheng, University of Minnesota

From Flocking Birds to Swarming Bacteria: A Study of the Dynamics of Active Fluids

Active fluids are a novel class of non-equilibrium complex fluids with examples across a wide range of biological and physical systems such as flocking animals, swarming microorganisms, vibrated granular rods, and suspensions of synthetic colloidal swimmers. Different from familiar non-equilibrium systems where free energy is injected from boundaries, an active fluid is a dispersion of large numbers of self-propelled units, which convert the ambient/internal free energy and maintain non-equilibrium steady states at microscopic scales. Due to this distinct feature, active fluids exhibit fascinating and unusual behaviors unseen in conventional complex fluids. Here, combining high-speed confocal microscopy, holographic imaging, rheological measurements and biochemical engineering, we experimentally investigate the dynamics of active fluids. In particular, we use E. coli suspensions as our model system and illustrate three unique properties of active fluids, i.e., (i) abnormal rheology, (ii) enhanced diffusion of passive tracers and (iii) emergence of collective swarming. Using theoretical tools of fluid mechanics and statistical mechanics, we develop a quantitative understanding of these interesting behaviors. Our study illustrates the general organizing principles of active fluids that can be exploited for designing “smart” fluids with controllable fluid properties. Our results also shed new light on fundamental transport processes in microbiological systems.
Computations in Science

February 27, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Amy Weeks, University of California, San Francisco

New Chemoenzymatic Tools for Dissecting Proteolytic Signaling Pathways

Proteolysis is a key post-translational modification that regulates a wide array of biological processes in human health and disease, including viral infection, cancer progression, organismal development, and neurodegeneration. However, few tools are available to identify proteolysis sites with single amino acid resolution. We have developed next-generation enzymatic tools that enable unbiased capture and sequencing of neo-N termini generated by proteolytic cleavage. These probes are based on subtiligase, a rationally designed variant of the serine protease subtilisin, which catalyzes a ligation reaction between a peptide ester and the N-terminal amine of a peptide or protein. We characterized ligation efficiency for >25,000 enzyme-substrate pairs, leading to the identification of a panel of subtiligase variants that enhance sequence coverage of the cellular N terminome. We have also developed a strategy for spatially-restricted N-terminal tagging that enables global analysis of proteolytic cleavage events at the plasma membrane. Using this technique, we have sequenced proteolytic cleavage sites in >500 human membrane proteins. By combining plasma membrane-targeted subtiligase with pharmacological protease inhibitor treatment, we have begun to define the proteases responsible for specific cleavage events. In combination with its ease of use, the high specificity and resolution of live-cell, subtiligase-catalyzed proteolysis mapping provide a powerful tool for dissecting proteolytic signaling pathways.
Chemistry

February 28, 2019
GCIS W301 | Thursday, 11:00 am

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Jane Wang, Cornell University

Insect Flight: from Newton’s law to Neurons


Insects are the first evolved to fly, and to fly is not to fall. How does an insect fly, why does it fly so well, and how can we infer its ‘thoughts’ from its flight dynamics? We have been seeking mechanistic explanations of the complex movement of insect flight. Starting from the Navier-Stokes equations governing the unsteady aerodynamics of flapping flight, we worked to build a theoretical framework for computing flight. This has led to new interpretations and predictions of the functions of an insect’s internal machinery that orchestrate its flight. I will discuss our recent computational and experimental studies of the balancing act of insets: how a dragonfly recovers from falling upside-down and how a fly balances in air. In each case, the physics of flight informs us about the neural feedback circuitries underlying their fast reflexes.
Physics Colloquium

February 28, 2019
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Jennifer Roizen, Duke University

Alcohol and Amine Derivatives Guide Position-Selective C–H Functionalization Reactions

Free radical reactions represent an important and versatile class of chemical transformations. Nitrogen-centered radical applications remain underexplored due to the lack of convenient methods for their generation. Recent advances have improved access to nitrogen-centered radicals through photoredox-mediated oxidation of two such directing groups: amides and sulfonamides. Guided by this approach, we hypothesized that alcohols, masked as sulfamate esters, and amines, masked as sulfamides, could engage in photoredox-mediated oxidation to furnish nitrogen-centered radicals that could guide C–H functionalization reactions.
Moreover, our directed technology has been inspired by one of the most reliable and powerful known reactions to guide C–H functionalization reactions: the Hofmann–Löffler–Freytag (HLF) reaction, which uses amines or amides as directing groups. Like many of the most robust radical-mediated technologies to direct the activation of tertiary and secondary centers, the HLF reaction is guided through 1,5-hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) processes, which proceeds through a kinetically-favorable six-membered ring transition state. By contrast, few reports describe 1,6-HAT with a traceless linker, such as an alcohol masked as a sulfamate ester or an amine masked as a sulfamide, and there are no general strategies to enable masked alcohols or amines to direct functionalization of aliphatic -C(sp3)–H centers. This talk will outline this novel strategy to harness alcohols and amines to replace C–H bonds at -C(sp3)–H centers, which are not generally accessible to directed functionalization. We will demonstrate that C–H abstraction can be robustly coupled with varied functionalization reactions. This talk will highlight the first generalizable synthetic strategy to functionalize -C(sp3)–H bonds based on masked alcohols or amines, to push the boundaries of organic chemistry at a fundamental level and benefits drug discovery.
Chemistry

March 1, 2019
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:45 pm

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Jennifer Lin, IAS


Kadanoff Seminar

March 4, 2019
PRC 201 | Monday, 1:30 pm

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Richard Schrock, MIT

Recent Advances in Olefin Metathesis with Molybdenum Catalysts

Molybdenum imido catalysts that are asymmetric at the metal, Mo(NR)(CHR')(X)(Y), where X and Y are different monoanionic ligands (e.g., a sterically demanding terphenoxide and a chloride or pyrrolide), have led to dramatic improvements in olefin metathesis chemistry in the last two years. Advances include the synthesis of monoaryloxide (X) chloride (Y) imido catalysts, kinetically E-selective macrocyclic ring-closing metathesis catalysts, stereoselective (Z or E) olefin metathesis reactions that use electron-poor olefins (ClCH=CHCl, CF3CH=CHCF3, BrCH=CHF, NCCH=CHCN), and ROMP reactions that yield cis,syndiotactic-A-alt-B copolymers from enantiomerically pure monomers. Mo=CHX complexes where X = Cl, Br, CF3, phosphonium, or CN have now been structurally characterized. The latest results concern the synthesis of the first catalytically active molybdenum oxo alkylidene complexes through addition of water to alkylidyne complexes. Other findings will be discussed as time permits.
Hillhouse Lecture

March 4, 2019
Kent 102 | Monday, 3:45 pm

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John Briggs PhD, LMB-MRC

How to assemble a retrovirus: the view from cryo-electron microscopy


Biophysical Dynamics

March 7, 2019
GCIS W301 | Thursday, 12:00 pm

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Frank Graziani, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

TBA


Physics Colloquium

March 7, 2019
KPTC 106 | Thursday, 4:00 pm

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Xiangfeng Duan, UCLA

Van der Waals Integration Before and Beyong 2D Materials

The heterogeneous integration of dissimilar materials is a long pursuit of material science community and has defined the material foundation for modern electronics and optoelectronics. The current material integration strategy such as chemical epitaxial growth usually involves strong chemical bonds and is typically limited to materials with strict structure match and processing compatibility. Van der Waals (vdW) integration, in which pre-fabricated building blocks are physically assembled together through weak vdW interactions, offers an alternative bond-free material strategy without lattice and processing limitations, as exemplified by 2D vdW heterostructures. In this talk I will discuss the development, challenges and opportunities of this emerging approach, generalizing it for flexible integration of diverse material systems beyond 2D, and prospect its potential for creating artificial heterostructures or superlattices beyond the reach of existing materials.
Chemistry

March 8, 2019
Kent 120 | Friday, 1:45 pm

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William A. Tisdale, MIT

Excitons, Entropy, and Nonequilibrium Transport in Semiconductor Nanomaterials

Structure, surface chemistry, and energetic disorder can dramatically affect excited state dynamics in low-dimensional systems. Using a combination of ultrafast laser spectroscopy, time-resolved optical microscopy, and kinetic modeling, I will show how these effects manifest in assemblies of colloidal quantum dots (QD) and atomically thin 2D semiconductors, which are promising components of next-generation photovoltaic and lighting technologies. In particular, I will demonstrate the counterintuitive role of entropy in the nonequilibrium population dynamics of excitons and charge carriers in nanoscale systems.
Chemistry

March 11, 2019
Kent 120 | Monday, 3:45 pm

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Raymond Kapral, University of Toronto

Molecular Machines and Synthetic Motors: Active Motion on Nanoscales

Molecular machines or motors in the cell operate under nonequilibrium
conditions and extract chemical energy from their surroundings to perform a
variety of transport and other biological functions. Synthetic nanomotors
without moving parts also operate under nonequilibrium conditions using
chemical energy to move in solution, and can transport cargo and perform
other functions. The operations of these tiny motors differ markedly from
their macroscopic counterparts. The mechanisms that lead to the directed
motion of chemically-powered motors, as well as some of their potential
applications, will be discussed. Since both molecular machines and synthetic
motors must respect the basic laws of dynamics while functioning under
nonequilibrium conditions, there are similarities between how these very
different nanomotors function. Systems containing many synthetic motors can
display collective behavior leading to active self-assembly, swarming and
other collective states that differ from those in systems at equilibrium, and
these new structures will also be described.
Chemistry

March 18, 2019
Kent 120 | Monday, 3:45 pm

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Monica Allen, The Department of Physics, University of California-San Diego

Visualization of Topological States of Matter Using Microwave Impedance Microscopy

A main thrust of condensed matter physics concerns the discovery of new electronic states in emerging materials. One example is the rapidly expanding class of topological materials, which are posited to enable realization of non-abelian particles and topological quantum computing. In this talk, I will discuss how exotic phenomena can arise from the interplay of ferromagnetism and topology. We employ microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), which characterizes the local complex conductivity of a material, to directly image chiral edge modes and phase transitions in a magnetic topological insulator. Finally, I will outline how MIM could be used in the future to visualize and manipulate Majorana modes, an emerging platform for quantum information processing.Host: David Schuster at 2-7191 or David.Schuster@uchicago.edu. Persons with a disability who may need assistance please contact Brenda Thomas at 2-7156 or by email at bthomas@uchicago.edu
The Tuesday JFI Seminar

March 19, 2019
GCIS W301 | Tuesday, 4:00 pm

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Hana El-Samad, University of California, San Francisco


Computations in Science

March 20, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Alberto Salleo

Professor Alberto Salleo from Stanford University will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

March 20, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Arvind Murugan, University of Chicago


Computations in Science

March 27, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Greg Bewley, Cornell University


Computations in Science

April 3, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Oskar Hallatschek, UC Berkeley


Computations in Science

April 10, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Rohit Karnik

Professor Rohit Karnik from Massachusetts Institute of Technology will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

April 10, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Nikta Fakhri, MIT


Computations in Science

April 17, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Detlef Lohse, University of Twente


Computations in Science

April 24, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Jeffrey Moore

Professor Jeffrey Moore from University of Illinois will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

April 24, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Kharasch Lecture: Professor Gregory Fu, Caltech

Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions: A Radical Alternative to Sn1 and Sn2 Reactions

Classical methods for achieving nucleophilic substitutions of alkyl electrophiles (SN1 and SN2) have limited scope and are not generally amenable to enantioselective variants that employ readily available racemic electrophiles. In this presentation, we will describe how the combination of radical chemistry and transition-metal catalysis has opened the door to addressing the challenges of reactivity and of enantioselectivity in nucleophilic substitution reactions of secondary and tertiary alkyl electrophiles.
Chemistry

April 29, 2019
Kent 120 | Monday, 3:45 pm

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Pankaj Mehta, Boston University


Computations in Science

May 1, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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FORUM 2019

Facilities Open-house Research Users Meeting

FORUM 2019
Facilities Open-house Research Users Meeting

Are innovation and resourcefulness part of your company's mission and philosophy?

Please join us for our first UChicago FORUM event focused on getting to know students, public access instrumentation facilities, and other regional resources.

What is the FORUM?

The FORUM is one of several ways for industry to see how resources, research, and talent at the University of Chicago aligns with their innovation needs.

Many companies are unaware of the opportunities available on campus. These opportunities include a variety of ways to get your foot in the door to test the waters. These opportunities include

Senior design projects in materials chemistry and engineering,
Advanced instrumentation and training available at hourly rates,
Project and internship based talent recruitment, as well as
Discovery of how faculty research topics are aligned with your innovation efforts.
Other avenues include networking with translational technology experts at the Polsky Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and other groups on or associated with the campus.

Register Now!

Who is this meeting for?

Corporate decision makers, Industrial/corporate scientists and engineers involved with:

Innovation Design & Implementation
Chemical Engineering
Process Development
Materials Science & Engineering
Failure Analysis
Materials Characterization
Also - Targeted talent recruitment of undergraduates and graduate students through internships, senior design projects, and consulting opportunities.
Tentative itinerary -

8:15 - 9:00 am Registration / Breakfast & Coffee
9:00 - 9:15 am Opening Remarks
9:15 - 10:30 am Project snapshots

10:30 - 11:00 am BREAK
11:00 - 11:45 am Keynote talk - Dr. Maria Kokkori (The Art Institute of Chicago)

11:45 - 1:00 pm Networking LUNCH
1:00 - 2:00 pm Poster session

2:00 - 3:00 pm Breakout sessions
3:00 - 4:00 pm. Facility Tours (limited space! - Sign up early)
MRSEC Special Event

May 3, 2019
ERC 161 | Friday, 8:15 am

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Thierry Emonet, Yale University


Computations in Science

May 8, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Darrell Irvine

Professor Darrell Irvine from Massachusetts Institute of Technology will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

May 8, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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David Lentik, Stanford


Computations in Science

May 15, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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Joshua Shaevitz, Princeton University


Computations in Science

May 22, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Sven Rogge

Professor Sven Rogge from the University of New South Wales will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

May 22, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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Xiaoming Mao, University of Michigan


Computations in Science

May 29, 2019
KPTC 206 | Wednesday, 12:15 pm

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series - Ralph Colby

Professor Ralph Colby from Penn State University will speak as part of the IME Distinguished Colloquium Series.

Event will be followed by a reception from 5 pm to 6 pm at ERC in IME’s 2nd floor lounge/atrium area
Molecular Engineering

June 5, 2019
KCBD 1103 | Wednesday, 4:00 pm

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